PC1 Pink Champagne Diamonds

Everything you need to know about PC1 Pink Champagne Diamonds

The Argyle mines are the world’s biggest producer of pink diamonds. Out of these mines, pink diamonds of all sorts, sizes and colours originate. Of the many types of diamonds mined in that area; the pink champagne diamonds are the topic of the day. The aesthetic look of these stones is unique, to say the least, however, is it worth it to buy one? Is purchasing PC1 pink champagne diamonds an investment worth taking? Here are some small ideas you can put into consideration before taking that step towards getting for yourself this eye-catching gem. 

How are champagne diamonds different from others?

Champagne diamonds are among the rare stones mined in the Argyle tunnels. The eye-catching colours arrest the gaze of many connoisseurs. The vivid pinkish hue with a mix of brownish or yellowish tint is a fantastic sight indeed. It is for this reason that these pink diamonds have gained a lot of popularity in the last few decades of the 20th century. 

What are PC1, PC2 and PC3 Pink Champagnes?

The Argyle mines, along with the companies that benefit from its rich veins developed its way of classifying the stones they mined. For champagne diamonds, they are classified as either PC1, PC2, or PC3. The labels indicate the level of clarity and clearness of a champagne diamond. Unlike all other pink diamond classifications, with pink champagne diamonds, the lower the classification number, the lesser the clarity.

Identifying PC1 Pink Champagne Diamonds

PC1 Pink Champagne Diamonds are the lowest classification on the pink champagne diamond scale. These diamonds display the lowest clarity within the diamond classification scale, quite often displaying blemishes or imperfections and are generally the ‘cheaper’ pink champagne diamond option. PC1 Pink Champagne diamonds also have the lowest intensity of colour according to the Argyle grading scale. Even though PC1 diamonds, may be low on the scale, they are still highly desirable and look absolutely stunning, displaying a subtle pink/brown/yellow hue.   

Uses of Pink Champagne diamonds

A growing trend for pink diamonds is for engagement rings, necklaces and other types of jewellery that are mean to be flaunted. The exquisite blend of brown, yellow and pink hues makes these diamonds a joy to view. The pinkish hue of these diamonds is not due to impurities, but on how the carbon atoms are lined up to a certain degree that allows pink light to scatter.

The relative lower price of pink champagne diamonds is mainly due to its recent surge in demand. Coloured diamonds, especially browns and yellows, which are more prevalent are destined to become drill bits, cutters and other heavy equipment needs that demand a durable substance. Abrasives also use small shared of diamonds leftover from cutting it to shape.

However, in the latter part of the 20th century, the pink diamonds slowly gained traction, and due to the overwhelming supply present in the Argyle mines, the diamonds became a thing. Now, coloured diamond connoisseurs prefer pink diamonds not only due to their incredible colour but for their price and potential investment as well.

How to choose the best champagne diamonds for your rings

The buyer needs to have an idea whether a type of stone is perfect for jewellery. Here is a small guide for anyone wanting to have an engagement ring with a big, shiny, pink champagne diamond set with all its glory shown to everyone. Here are some of the considerations you need to put in mind. 

In many jewellery stores, most pink diamonds will be categorised into three types.

Fancy – These diamonds are pure and have a robust and intense champagne colour. Due to their purity and rarity, fancy type champagnes are among the most expensive stone types.  

Off-coloured – These diamonds are technically still pink champagnes, but their brown or yellowish tint is more prominent rather than the pink hue. It is like the slider for their colour has shifted a bit off centre, thus the name, off-coloured. 

Enhanced – These are stones that have artificially improved to get the pinkish champagne look. It is done using modern technology of diamond producing and by applying exact pressure to achieve the molecular arrangement to meet the scattering of pink light effect. 

All of these stones are relatively rare, and so it is best to get these diamonds from the source. In this case, the Argyle mines in Western Australia. If you buy these gemstones in the shopping mall, it will have an outrageously high mark up. So, if possible, go directly to the source and enjoy the beauty of diamonds, the Earth’s hardest substance. For further information, contact Argyle Diamond Investments today!

PC1 Pink Champagne Diamonds - pink champagne diamond